The activist entrepreneur: profiles and inventories of circular demands and actions

Description

The project aims to set out the profiles and inventories of the circular actions taken by activist entrepreneurs. The inventories of demands detail the means of intervention and communication in the public space with respect to a stance rooted in circular values.

With that in mind, the research aims to identify the ways in which entrepreneurs reconcile the business aspect and the common good in order to understand how some will change institutional standards and rules in the circular economy to reflect their values and develop business opportunities.

Themes

  • Entrepreneur activist
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Institutional entrepreneurship
  • Political Activism
  • User community

Affiliated research axes

Axis 4: Policy levers

Collaborators

Mireille Lalancette

UQTR

Mylène Raymond

UQTR

Amount granted

$15,000
Fast fashion: destruction of unsold items and public

Description

The proposal takes a broad look at the phenomenon of fast fashion (FF) and, more specifically, at the destruction of unsold inventory by retailers. It considers the upstream decisions that are responsible for the harmful practices and the lack of circular end-of-life options for unsold goods. The theoretical model that is developed will explore how public policy influences the environmental impact of FF.

The project is in follow-up to the confirmation of the linearity of the apparel sector and additional burden created by FF and reinforces the need to develop a model of mechanisms and incentives that can have a positive impact on decision-making by retailers with respect to their unsold inventories.

Themes

  • Circular economy
  • Consumer awareness
  • Consumer behavior
  • Sustainable consumption
  • Sustainable consumption and supply
  • Textile circularity

Affiliated research axes

Axis 1: Change and Transition Management

Axis 2: Planning Optimization

Axis 3: Resource and Product Maximization

Axis 4: Policy levers

Amount granted

$15,000
New approaches in contracts and environmental regulations to implement a circular supply chain in spring street sweeping

Description

Every year, northern countries purchase and spread mineral abrasives (sand and crushed stone) on their road networks as part of their winter maintenance operations. The 31,000 km overseen by the Ministère des Transports du Québec require an average of 1 million tonnes of abrasives annually. In the spring, a portion of the abrasives is collected during road sweeping operations. Subject to strict environmental regulations, most of the material that is recovered is landfilled. Considering the negative financial and environmental impacts of landfilling, the technical feasibility of conditioning recovered abrasives for reuse in winter maintenance operations was demonstrated at the local level by screening the residual material. Part of the collected material (sweepings) could therefore be reused as abrasives through the implementation of a circular economy strategy that would curb landfilling and the consumption of non-renewable virgin mineral resources.

The project aims to review the flow maps of the circular chain based on the regulatory approach of a recovery centre in the construction, renovation and demolition sector and propose new and equitable contractual approaches for the circular chain.

Themes

  • Circular city
  • Circular region
  • Governance
  • Innovation
  • Local circularity policies
  • Recovery
  • Residual materials
  • Urban experimentation
  • Waste management

Affiliated research axes

Axis 2: Planning Optimization

Axis 3: Resource and Product Maximization

Axis 4: Policy levers

Collaborators

Karine Bouchard

Biopterre

Florence Blouin

UQTR

Bechir Ben Daya

UQTR

Amount granted

$15,000
Co-construction of a local understanding of the circular economy: vision, assessment and governance in Victoriaville

Description

The project examines the CE vision, governance and practices at a municipal level.

It focuses on three key CE sectors: food, energy (including transportation) and waste (Keblowski et al 2020). Two key research issues are raised:

  1. How do stakeholders understand CE as a concept and what is their understanding of CE practices and assessment in a city and region like Victoriaville?
  2. How is CE governed and practiced by different political and social stakeholders?

The questions will be explored from the perspectives of the concepts of the socio-technological vision and the governance of the socioecological transition.

Themes

  • Circular economy
  • Energy policy
  • Governance
  • Residual materials
  • Transition
  • Transport

Affiliated research axes

Axis 1: Change and Transition Management

Axis 2: Planning Optimization

Axis 3: Resource and Product Maximization

Axis 4: Policy levers

Collaborators

Maëva Botrel

Cité de l'innovation circulaire

Valérie Lacombe

UQAM

Fabien Kerambrun

UQAM

Amount granted

$15,000
Characterization of circular economy jobs and their quality in Québec’s social economy enterprises (SEEs)

Description

The growing interest in the circular economy (CE) as a response to the requirements of sustainable development raises many questions about the transformations CE will bring about, particularly in the labour market.

The research therefore aims to describe, categorize and assess the quality of core circular jobs in SEEs.

There are two types of circular jobs: core jobs and enabling jobs. This study focuses on core jobs, which sustain material loops and constitute the pillars of the CE. It is essential to understand their characteristics and ensure their quality upstream of eventual mutations. For that reason, the research will also consider the social and solidarity economy, which brings together organizations and businesses whose objective is to promote social well-being.

Themes

  • Change
  • Circular economy
  • Circular employment
  • Quality employment
  • Social and solidarity economy
  • Sustainable development

Affiliated research axes

Axis 1: Change and Transition Management

Axis 4: Policy levers

Collaborators

Clara Alagy

Polytechnique Montréal

Gaëlle Généreux

TIESS

Amount granted

$15,000
The second life of things: a sociological study of the process to reappropriate obsolete objects

Description

The research project is part of the literature on sustainable consumption, the relationship to objects and daily life. It aims to explore how everyday objects (e.g., clothing, computers, furniture, books, decorations, etc.) gain a second life after falling out of common use.

The objectives are three-fold:

  1. Understand the process by which objects fall out of common use and are reappropriated in relation to, among other things, the symbolic aspect, the culture and social norms, the spaces in which they circulate and stakeholders, as well as the broader social context, including institutions and regulations.
  2. Identify levers to transform consumption practices, extend the service life of objects and reduce material resource consumption.
  3. Formulate recommendations to promote different ways of optimizing the use of everyday objects and ensure concerns about sustainable consumption and circular economy research initiatives are aligned.

An ethnographic survey will be conducted in different spaces where objects are repaired, sold, exchanged or donated (e.g., fab labs, garage sales, online ads, stores, repairers, etc.) and follow the journeys of the objects themselves.

Themes

  • Everyday life
  • Household consumption
  • Material life
  • Obsolete items
  • Sobriety
  • Sustainable consumption

Affiliated research axes

Axis 1: Change and Transition Management

Axis 4: Policy levers

Amount granted

$15,000
Circular cities and regions in Canada: exploratory analysis of policy instruments and territorial and political-administrative conditions inherent in various circularity strategies

Description

This project is led within the context of the latest report by the Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement, entitled L'état des lieux et la gestion des résidus ultimes, which identifies circular economy as the first strategy to implement to reduce ultimate waste in Québec.

Based on an approach rooted in urban geography and political science, it aims to develop operationalizable tools for the design and implementation of area circular economy initiatives by local and regional governments. With these tools, cities will not only be able to identify optimal areas of excellence adapted to their particular territorial contexts but also target public interventions (e.g., zoning) to create conditions conducive to the circularity initiatives they seek to set in motion.

The project explores the key question of the processes, policies and instruments that could enable cities and regions to design and deploy circular economy policies tailored to their spatial and socio-economic contexts.

Themes

  • Circular city
  • Circular region
  • Governance
  • Local circularity policies
  • Regional circularity policies

Affiliated research axes

Axis 2: Planning Optimization

Axis 4: Policy levers

Collaborators

Pénélope Regnier-Sakamoto

UQAM

Amount granted

$15,000
Results of a Canada-wide study on zero waste transformed into art and impacts on environmentally responsible behaviours

Description

In Canada in 2016, only 9% of plastic was recycled, with packaging accounting for 47% of all plastic waste. There are several reasons why, including the operational limitations of facilities and recycling that requires selective separation and uncontaminated containers. In an effort to address the issue, the project aims to lead a pan-Canadian study on the levers of change for a transition to a zero-waste product offering.

The project’s innovation lies in its knowledge mobilization method, which raises awareness through art. Ten artists (writers, musicians, painters, etc.) will analyze the qualitative and quantitative data from the research and provide their interpretations in plain language. This co-creation approach cannot be categorized, since the results extend beyond standard environmental science theories. It is inspired by assumptions in art-based methodologies, sociological art and ecological art involving social interventions that actively engage communities.

The works will be presented in public spaces to provide avenues for understanding and discussion on ecology for audiences who are less familiar with the scientific and artistic communities.

Themes

  • Art-based methodologies
  • Change management
  • Circular economy
  • Environmentally responsible behaviours
  • Research-creation
  • Zero waste

Affiliated research axes

Axis 1: Change and Transition Management

Axis 4: Policy levers

Collaborators

Valérie Demers

Chargée de projet RRECQ

Amount granted

$15,000
The RRECQ is supported by the Fonds de recherche du Québec.
Fonds de recherche - Québec